The Green Tea Martini: An Analysis


Last night I made the green tea martini. The recipe calls for a tsp of Cointreau, an ounce of chilled green tea and two ounces of orange flavored vodka with a drop of simple syrup. I omitted the simple syrup because of the sugar in the Cointreau – I’m more of a savory person than sweet – and added chopped fresh ginger to the green tea.

I then recalled the scene from The Thin Man when Nick Charles, played by William Powell, explains proper technique:

The important thing is the rhythm! Always have rhythm in your shaking. Now a Manhattan you shake to fox-trot time, a Bronx to two-step time, a dry martini you always shake to waltz time.

So I shook the green tea martini at a waltz time and then poured it into a chilled martini glass. The color was reminiscent of chardonnay. The orange and ginger dominated the taste of the green tea, leaving a fresh zing on the palette. Unlike the classic martini, or even the vodka martini, this cocktail is a featherweight. You start to feel unconditional love for all of humankind at about three-quarters of the way through the drink.